Alexi Ashe—the future Mrs. Seth Meyers—is a human rights lawyer, which is ironic considering she is now taking away your right to marry Seth Meyers at some point in the foreseeable future.

What’s wrong with a NYers take on the BART strike

"The tech executive assumes that people who are stranded by BART can simply arrange for an alternative way of getting to their destination. (Incidentally, his company is also the one running a helicopters-for-commuters promotion to take advantage of the BART strike.) But the Oakland resident doesn’t work at Google or Facebook, where free shuttle service is provided, and she can’t easily get herself around by car. For the tech executive, a BART strike is an annoyance. For the salon worker, it’s a threat to basic existence.” 

Kevin Roose penned a piece in New York about the current BART strike that’s making life incredibly difficult for anyone who relies on the service as part of his or her daily routine. 

His larger point is a valid one — that the privatization of transit means that for upper-income Bay Area residents, the strike may be felt less severely than it is for lower-income residents. 

But the two points he contrasts are a tech executive and a salon worker in Oakland. Do we believe the that the tech executive would be taking BART normally? Most likely not. Why not quote regular folks — even regular folks who work in the tech industry — to illustrate some of the more complicated aspects of his premise. People who work downtown for startups take BART from Oakland, Berkeley, the Mission and the Peninsula. And most likely for the vast majority of workers in tech or otherwise, taking a Lyft for $15 each way (this is within SF) isn’t sustainable. Are people ride-sharing without these apps? Are they working from home? Are they commuting at off hours?

Not all tech workers take shuttles to work. And not all non-tech workers find a BART strike a “threat to basic existence”. The generalizations in this piece mostly serve to make the NY-based author sound like he doesn’t know the Bay Area nearly as well as he thinks he does, nor as well as the many, many people — tech workers or not — whose daily lives are affected by the ongoing BART strike. 

*incidentally, of the ride-sharing apps he describes, one is a cab company (Flywheel) and two are the same company (Lyft and Zimride, with Zimride no longer being in service). 

(via Cover Story: Bert and Ernie Celebrate Gay Marriage : The New Yorker)
I’ve often thought that the single most devastating cyberattack a diabolical and anarchic mind could design would not be on the military or financial sector but simply to simultaneously make every e-mail and text ever sent universally public. It would be like suddenly subtracting the strong nuclear force from the universe; the fabric of society would instantly evaporate, every marriage, friendship and business partnership dissolved. Civilization, which is held together by a fragile web of tactful phrasing, polite omissions and white lies, would collapse in an apocalypse of bitter recriminations and weeping, breakups and fistfights, divorces and bankruptcies, scandals and resignations, blood feuds, litigation, wholesale slaughter in the streets and lingering ill will.
I recognize that as a runner, I’m supposed to be supportive of ALL runners… but:
1. I finished Bay 2 Breakers about 1 second ahead of a man who appears to weigh 300 lbs (and looks to be EXTREMELY happy about finished).
2. The lady behind me appears to be about to throw up, just a few seconds from crossing the finish line. 
Another successful year!

I recognize that as a runner, I’m supposed to be supportive of ALL runners… but:

1. I finished Bay 2 Breakers about 1 second ahead of a man who appears to weigh 300 lbs (and looks to be EXTREMELY happy about finished).

2. The lady behind me appears to be about to throw up, just a few seconds from crossing the finish line. 

Another successful year!

This week Stumptown Coffee Roasters reveals its most ambitious project to date. The company spent nearly $1 million to transform a neglected Greenwich Village storefront (it was once the Eighth Street Bookshop, a literary hangout that closed in 1979) into a coffee shop with unusually sumptuous details: coffered ceiling, walnut bar, custom wallpaper screened by hand in Portland, Ore. The shop includes a separate brew bar, where you may order any coffee in the catalog prepared on your choice of gadget, including AeroPress, Bee House, Chemex, French press, siphon and V60.

How are you supposed to remember the name of how you want your coffee brewed before you’ve had caffeine?

Stumptown and Intelligentsia Will Brew Coffee to Exact Details - NYTimes.com

In the old days, teachers knew if students understood the course from the expressions on their faces. Now some classes, including one of Mr. Guardia’s, are entirely virtual. Engagement information could give the colleges early warning about which students might flunk out, while more broadly letting teachers know if the whole class is falling behind.
CourseSmart E-Textbooks Track Students’ Progress for Teachers - NYTimes.com (this is pretty interesting stuff. If your professor knows you haven’t done the reading and neither have the 15 other people in the class, should they slow down the material? Or have that affect overall grade? It’s the wild wild west out here in edtech….)
I am a teacher. I teach people what they want and need to know, all about living,” Martha says. “And the subject is quite vast so you have to be pretty good at a lot of different things to teach the subject of living.
— Also in this piece. “Zero. Fucks. Given.” Martha Stewart’s Best Lesson: Don’t Give a Damn - The Cut
My life, in a pie chart (minus spring crushes, plus 30 percent off sale at J Crew) (via The Lean In Pie | The Hairpin)

My life, in a pie chart (minus spring crushes, plus 30 percent off sale at J Crew) (via The Lean In Pie | The Hairpin)

Inevitably, when I left my job, it devastated me. I couldn’t just rally and move on. I did not know how to value who I was versus what I did. What I did was who I was.
— I very much felt this sentiment after getting laid off. Which is why I try to remember to let who I am - the decisions I make, friends I have, things I say - define me, and not the office where I spent 10 hours a day. Is There Life After Work? - NYTimes.com